Home / Tech News / Weekly Rewind: Smartphones' effect on conversation, how to hide your wires, where to watch cartoons

Weekly Rewind: Smartphones' effect on conversation, how to hide your wires, where to watch cartoons


A lot can happen in a week when it comes to tech. The constant onslaught of news makes it nigh impossible for mere mortals with real lives to keep track of everything. That’s why we’ve compiled a quick and dirty list of this week’s top 10 tech stories, from what those revelations about the CIA’s hacking capabilities mean for you to a flying car — it’s all here.

Google says Android exploits mentioned in the CIA leak have been patched

If you have an Android phone and this week’s revelations about the CIA’s hacking capabilities have you worried, we have some good news. On Thursday, Google told members of the press that many of the exploits and vulnerabilities mentioned in the report have been patched in subsequent versions of Android.

“As we’ve reviewed the documents, we’re confident that security updates and protections in both Chrome and Android already shield users from many of these alleged vulnerabilities,” said Heather Adkins, Google’s director of information security and privacy

Read the full story here.

Your favorite cartoon classics are about to get their own streaming service

If you’re fan of classic cartoons, or your kids have yet to discover the hilarious delights of the shows that had you chuckling when you were a tot, then you might want to hear about a new online streaming service. Launching in the coming weeks, Time Warner’s new stand-alone video-on-demand service will offer much of the fabulous cartoon work created by Hanna-Barbera, Looney Tunes, and MGM that stretches back decades.

Read the full story here.

World’s first single-atom magnet is capable of storing a single bit of data

IBM said on Wednesday that it has created the world’s smallest magnet by using a single atom. While you may ask what would be the point, consider that hard drives rely on magnetism to store data on their spinning discs. These drives are capable of using around 100,000 atoms to store a single bit of data. But with IBM’s new magnetic atom, one bit of data can be stored per atom, opening the door to new storage possibilities.

Read the full story here.

Are smartphones killing the art of face-to-face conversation? We ask the experts

Smartphones are everywhere now, and for many of us they serve as a constant companion. They keep us continually connected, filling gaps in our day, entertaining us, and demanding our attention with a string of notifications. Because they offer a convenient alternative to face-to-face conversations, and at times they butt into our chats directly, there’s a growing realization that they may be killing the art of conversation.

Read the full story here.

Are fidget toys legitimately good for your brain, or pseudoscientific snake oil?

Fidget Cube has inevitably been followed by a number of other crowdfunding campaigns designed to appeal to the twitchy fingers of those who supported it. One was a fidget pen called Think Ink, which combines a titanium pen exterior with a number of tactile elements for distracted fingers to play with. It hit more than quadruple its funding target. But is this really a thing — or is the idea that a distracting toy can actually help us just a pseudoscientific marketing ploy?

Read the full story here.



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